Key Learning Area: English
Duration: 7 Weeks
Stage: 2
Unit of work: Cooperating Communities
Strand: Talking and Listening, Reading and Writing

Statement of ability: (What students can already do?)
Students can:
  • Contribute information and express ideas in class discussions
  • Give some arguments for and against a particular topic.
  • Give simple reasons for opinions and share ideas.
  • Some students can identify heading and be able to identify the argument.
  • Some can plan and sequence information for specific text type.





Needs analysis: (Where do they need to go?) (Skills)
Students need to be able to:
· Write simple persuasive texts, which show arguments for and against.
· Present evidence of different points of view.
· Identify and assess arguments.
· Follow a line of argument
· Present simple reasons for opinions and share ideas.
· Combine simple sentences into complex ones using common conjunctions.
· Include grammatical features in writing like; thinking verbs, modality words, simple and detailed noun groups,
· Understand the content words.
· Use a variety of connectives.















What are the central ideas: (I want the students to know and understand…..) (Knowledge)
Students will know and understand:
  • Use connectives, compound and complex sentences in writing.
  • Recognise and write simple discussions.
  • Understand the structure and function of a paragraph.
  • Use persuasive language.



Why does this learning matter?
Students need to know this because:
Language is central to students’ intellectual, social and emotional development and has an essential role in all key learning areas. Students will develop the ability to talk, listen, read, view and write with purpose, effect and confidence. They will develop knowledge of the ways in which language varies according to context. They will develop knowledge and understanding of the language structures and grammar of Standard Australian English. The grammar is used as a tool to help students understand how sentences are structured so that they are meaningful, clear and syntactically accurate.

















How do I want my students to demonstrate their deep understanding and how well do I want my students to do this? (formal / informal assessment task, cumulative/summative assessment, key aspects developed, types of work samples)
  • Students will demonstrate their ability to identify the organisational features of a discussion text and describe and apply the grammatical features throughout the course of this unit of work. Observation, work samples, pre and post assessments will be used to assess student progress and evaluate teaching program.










1.Key outcomes
TS2.1 Communicates in informal and formal classroom activities in school and social situations for an increasing range of purposes on a variety of topics across the curriculum.
TS2.2 Interacts effectively in groups and pairs, adopting a range of roles, uses a variety of media and uses various listening strategies for different situation.
RS2.6 Uses efficiently an integrated range of skills and strategies when reading and interpreting written texts.
RS2.8 Discusses the text structure of a range of text types and the grammatical features that are characteristic of those text types.
WS2.9 Drafts, revises, proofreads and publishes well-structured texts that are more demanding in terms of topic, audience and written language features.
WS2.10 Produces texts clearly, effectively and accurately, using the sentence structure, grammatical features and punctuation conventions of the text type.
2. Indicators
  • Combines clauses by using a variety of conjunctions, eg when, because.
  • Expresses a point of view in writing with some supporting arguments.
  • Identifies the use of modality in persuasive writing.
  • Locates and sorts information on a topic from a variety of sources.
  • Responds to different view points in a discussion.
  • Justifies a point of view with supporting evidence.
3. Links to ESL scales
Listening
2.1.x Recognises that a point of view is being expressed.
Reading
1.6.1 Identifies the purpose of a simple persuasive text.
3.7.x Identifies key phrases expressing point of view eg I think…
Writing
2.9.1 Contributes to group writing of a persuasive text.
3.11 Uses some modality words.
3.9.2 Gives reason to support a point of view.
4a. Role of specialist staff/ Organisation of support time (ESL/STLA/SLSOs)
Team Teaching
Both teachers roving during group or paired work.



4b. Organisational statement (groupings, reasons for grouping )
Students will compete activities as a whole class, small groups, pairs or as individuals as specified in the sequence of teaching and learning activities. Small groups and pairs may at times be determined by the teacher based on need and ability to facilitate learning opportunities. Students will also be given opportunities to choose their own small groups/pairs.
a. Quality Teaching elements:
The 5 elements listed below are essential components for all lessons and units of work:
Engagement (E); Metalanguage (M); Substantive Communication (SC); Connectedness (C); Knowledge Integration (KI)
Teachers are required to incorporate these elements into their program.
5b. Circle the 2/3 additional elements that are a focus for this unit. Annotate your teaching and learning sequence with these codes.
Intellectual Quality
Quality Learning Environment
Significance
Deep Knowledge (DK)
Deep Understanding (DU)
Problematic Knowledge (PK)
Higher Order Thinking (HOT)
Metalanguage (M)
Substantive Communication (SC)
Explicit Quality Criteria (EQC)
Engagement (E)
High Expectation (HE)
Social Support (SS)
Student Self Regulation (SSR)
Student Direction (SD)
Background Knowledge (BK)
Cultural Knowledge (CK)
Knowledge Integration (KI)
Inclusivity (I)
Connectedness (C)
Narrative(N)





















Target language/ language focus
Controlled
Guided
Independent
Assessment
Sequence of teaching / learning activities
Oral

Reading

Writing

Registration
Justifying opinions


*





Lesson 1
Discussion topic one “Should pets’ be allowed in the park?” Students move to the ‘agree’, ‘no opinion’ or ‘disagree’ part of the room, then justify their opinion (In small groups) using ‘I think...because’.

·



Comparing. contrasting
·



As a whole class, read dogs on the beach article. Then model how to find for and against opinions and list under correct order.

·


Comparing. Contrasting, prepositional language

·


In pairs, about 5 mins, verbally decide which opinions should go under which heading. Discuss as a whole class by sharing opinions verbally. Make connections to prepositional phrases. “The dog on the beach, Dogs next to people etc… As a whole class, using student help, list opinions under correct headings for and against onto butchers paper. Then ask students to come to front to place pictures under correct headings as well.
·
·
·

Identifying arguments.

·


Students then use the information collected and adapt with similar topic should dogs be allowed to play in the park? In pairs, students will have to write opinions under for and against heading. Use pictures here as well for further prompts. They can re-use some arguments from beach activity. Furthermore, students will have picture prompts to help come up with more arguments.
·

·


·



Discuss arguments as a whole class and re-connect to prepositions.
·



Dividing and identifying arguments.
·



Lesson 2
Discussion topic two, “Should schools have swimming pools?”
As a whole class, observe topic pictures and ask students to decide what they think the topic for discussion is just by looking at the pictures. Explain activity, which is the same as last weeks lesson, deciding and dividing arguments for and against under columns.
·



Simple sentences and clauses, questioning.

·


Students break into pairs and each pair receives a small pack of pictures about the topic. Students are required to first place the pictures under for and against headings and then write simple sentences and clauses next to each picture, which will state the argument.
For fast finishers, pairs can think of extra arguments not shown in the pictures.
·

·

Modality words
·



Lesson 3
Discussion topic three, “Should girls and boys play sport together?”
Introduce modality words e.g. should, shouldn’t, must, certainly, could and explain that they make arguments stronger. Ask students if they can to the list of modal words. Introduce topic three and poster advertisement.
·



Describing and discussing arguments.

·


Students to break up into pairs and discuss arguments for and against girls and boys playing sport together. Picture prompts will be added but not too many. Share arguments by splitting class in half. Half on one side will share ‘for’ and the other half will share ‘against’. This enables pairs to hear a variety of opinions to add on the poster advertisement.
·



Modality words, simple and compound sentences.

·


Explain to students that they will now need to decide on three arguments for and three against to include on their poster. They will need to use modality words listed on the board and make sure they include a variety of simple and compound sentences. Revise this if necessary. This will be a draft in pencil. Students can decorate and finish on A3 paper in class teachers time. Poster can be displayed around the room.
·

·

Agreeing or disagreeing

·


Lesson 4
Discussion topic four, “Should kids have bike licences?”
Break up into small groups for 5 minutes to discuss topic. Each group to share ideas, but at the end of each group sharing their ideas, the other groups can respond by agreeing or disagreeing.
·



Sequencing

·


Students then receive a jumbled discussion on the topic and in pairs will need to reorder, but explain that it doesn’t matter which argument comes first.
·
·


Compound sentences


·

Students complete the last part independently. They will need to write an extra argument for and an extra argument against on separate pieces of paper strips handed out by the teacher. Focus on compound sentences and remind. They can use ideas shared at the beginning of the lesson, or one of the pictures which will be displayed at the front of the class. Once the teacher has proofread their extra arguments students can then add them to their jumbled text and paste in books. Display teachers A3 un-jumbled text on board.


·

Dictation

·



Lesson 5
Discussion topic five, “Should there be more recycling bins in the local community?”
Explain to students that they will need to use their imagination for this activity, to pretend. Students will need to imagine that the two teachers in the class are guest speakers (or ask Glenn and Dalz to come down at separate times to act as if they are from the local council expressing either for / against arguments for above topic). Students listen and when they leave recalling the arguments raised as a class. Teachers can add the points on the board. Teacher to introduce pictures and see if any match what speakers talked about.
·




·



Modelling how to compose a simple discussion on above topic with approx two supporting arguments. Inform students they will need to come up with the third argument Independently.
·
·
·

Complex sentences, connectives


·

Once modal / joint construction is complete, students copy into books, adding one extra argument for and against. In modal, use complex sentences, connectives.


·

Comparing, negotiating, describing.
·
·


Lesson 6
Discussion topic six, “Should there be more community facilities in the area?”
In small groups students will orally discuss the community facilities that are in the local area. Ones that they probably use. Each group will share responses to class while teacher writes them on white board or butchers paper. Break up into same groups but this time discussing facilities they would like to see in their area like an ice skating rink, or homeless centres etc… Share and the teacher to add them on the board/butchers paper.
·



Simple discussion.



·
Using all the knowledge learnt this far, student’s write a simple discussion on above topic. Make sure there are a lot of picture prompts and discussion examples at the front of the room to assist students. Depending on class limit the amount of arguments. 2-3 on each.


·

























Evaluation
What worked: (include comments about pedagogy, student achievement and staff roles where appropriate)













Future directions: (strategies used, concepts revisited)














Key Learning Area: English
Duration: 7 Weeks
Stage: 2
Unit of work: Cooperating Communities
Strand: Talking and Listening, Reading and Writing

Statement of ability: (What students can already do?)
Students can:
  • Contribute information and express ideas in class discussions
  • Give some arguments for and against a particular topic.
  • Give simple reasons for opinions and share ideas.
  • Some students can identify heading and be able to identify the argument.
  • Some can plan and sequence information for specific text type.





Needs analysis: (Where do they need to go?) (Skills)
Students need to be able to:
· Write simple persuasive texts, which show arguments for and against.
· Present evidence of different points of view.
· Identify and assess arguments.
· Follow a line of argument
· Present simple reasons for opinions and share ideas.
· Combine simple sentences into complex ones using common conjunctions.
· Include grammatical features in writing like; thinking verbs, modality words, simple and detailed noun groups,
· Understand the content words.
· Use a variety of connectives.















What are the central ideas: (I want the students to know and understand…..) (Knowledge)
Students will know and understand:
  • Use connectives, compound and complex sentences in writing.
  • Recognise and write simple discussions.
  • Understand the structure and function of a paragraph.
  • Use persuasive language.



Why does this learning matter?
Students need to know this because:
Language is central to students’ intellectual, social and emotional development and has an essential role in all key learning areas. Students will develop the ability to talk, listen, read, view and write with purpose, effect and confidence. They will develop knowledge of the ways in which language varies according to context. They will develop knowledge and understanding of the language structures and grammar of Standard Australian English. The grammar is used as a tool to help students understand how sentences are structured so that they are meaningful, clear and syntactically accurate.

















How do I want my students to demonstrate their deep understanding and how well do I want my students to do this? (formal / informal assessment task, cumulative/summative assessment, key aspects developed, types of work samples)
  • Students will demonstrate their ability to identify the organisational features of a discussion text and describe and apply the grammatical features throughout the course of this unit of work. Observation, work samples, pre and post assessments will be used to assess student progress and evaluate teaching program.










1.Key outcomes
TS2.1 Communicates in informal and formal classroom activities in school and social situations for an increasing range of purposes on a variety of topics across the curriculum.
TS2.2 Interacts effectively in groups and pairs, adopting a range of roles, uses a variety of media and uses various listening strategies for different situation.
RS2.6 Uses efficiently an integrated range of skills and strategies when reading and interpreting written texts.
RS2.8 Discusses the text structure of a range of text types and the grammatical features that are characteristic of those text types.
WS2.9 Drafts, revises, proofreads and publishes well-structured texts that are more demanding in terms of topic, audience and written language features.
WS2.10 Produces texts clearly, effectively and accurately, using the sentence structure, grammatical features and punctuation conventions of the text type.
2. Indicators
  • Combines clauses by using a variety of conjunctions, eg when, because.
  • Expresses a point of view in writing with some supporting arguments.
  • Identifies the use of modality in persuasive writing.
  • Locates and sorts information on a topic from a variety of sources.
  • Responds to different view points in a discussion.
  • Justifies a point of view with supporting evidence.
3. Links to ESL scales
Listening
2.1.x Recognises that a point of view is being expressed.
Reading
1.6.1 Identifies the purpose of a simple persuasive text.
3.7.x Identifies key phrases expressing point of view eg I think…
Writing
2.9.1 Contributes to group writing of a persuasive text.
3.11 Uses some modality words.
3.9.2 Gives reason to support a point of view.
4a. Role of specialist staff/ Organisation of support time (ESL/STLA/SLSOs)
Team Teaching
Both teachers roving during group or paired work.



4b. Organisational statement (groupings, reasons for grouping )
Students will compete activities as a whole class, small groups, pairs or as individuals as specified in the sequence of teaching and learning activities. Small groups and pairs may at times be determined by the teacher based on need and ability to facilitate learning opportunities. Students will also be given opportunities to choose their own small groups/pairs.
a. Quality Teaching elements:
The 5 elements listed below are essential components for all lessons and units of work:
Engagement (E); Metalanguage (M); Substantive Communication (SC); Connectedness (C); Knowledge Integration (KI)
Teachers are required to incorporate these elements into their program.
5b. Circle the 2/3 additional elements that are a focus for this unit. Annotate your teaching and learning sequence with these codes.
Intellectual Quality
Quality Learning Environment
Significance
Deep Knowledge (DK)
Deep Understanding (DU)
Problematic Knowledge (PK)
Higher Order Thinking (HOT)
Metalanguage (M)
Substantive Communication (SC)
Explicit Quality Criteria (EQC)
Engagement (E)
High Expectation (HE)
Social Support (SS)
Student Self Regulation (SSR)
Student Direction (SD)
Background Knowledge (BK)
Cultural Knowledge (CK)
Knowledge Integration (KI)
Inclusivity (I)
Connectedness (C)
Narrative(N)





















Target language/ language focus
Controlled
Guided
Independent
Assessment
Sequence of teaching / learning activities
Oral

Reading

Writing

Registration
Justifying opinions


*





Lesson 1
Discussion topic one “Should pets’ be allowed in the park?” Students move to the ‘agree’, ‘no opinion’ or ‘disagree’ part of the room, then justify their opinion (In small groups) using ‘I think...because’.

·



Comparing. contrasting
·



As a whole class, read dogs on the beach article. Then model how to find for and against opinions and list under correct order.

·


Comparing. Contrasting, prepositional language

·


In pairs, about 5 mins, verbally decide which opinions should go under which heading. Discuss as a whole class by sharing opinions verbally. Make connections to prepositional phrases. “The dog on the beach, Dogs next to people etc… As a whole class, using student help, list opinions under correct headings for and against onto butchers paper. Then ask students to come to front to place pictures under correct headings as well.
·
·
·

Identifying arguments.

·


Students then use the information collected and adapt with similar topic should dogs be allowed to play in the park? In pairs, students will have to write opinions under for and against heading. Use pictures here as well for further prompts. They can re-use some arguments from beach activity. Furthermore, students will have picture prompts to help come up with more arguments.
·

·


·



Discuss arguments as a whole class and re-connect to prepositions.
·



Dividing and identifying arguments.
·



Lesson 2
Discussion topic two, “Should schools have swimming pools?”
As a whole class, observe topic pictures and ask students to decide what they think the topic for discussion is just by looking at the pictures. Explain activity, which is the same as last weeks lesson, deciding and dividing arguments for and against under columns.
·



Simple sentences and clauses, questioning.

·


Students break into pairs and each pair receives a small pack of pictures about the topic. Students are required to first place the pictures under for and against headings and then write simple sentences and clauses next to each picture, which will state the argument.
For fast finishers, pairs can think of extra arguments not shown in the pictures.
·

·

Modality words
·



Lesson 3
Discussion topic three, “Should girls and boys play sport together?”
Introduce modality words e.g. should, shouldn’t, must, certainly, could and explain that they make arguments stronger. Ask students if they can to the list of modal words. Introduce topic three and poster advertisement.
·



Describing and discussing arguments.

·


Students to break up into pairs and discuss arguments for and against girls and boys playing sport together. Picture prompts will be added but not too many. Share arguments by splitting class in half. Half on one side will share ‘for’ and the other half will share ‘against’. This enables pairs to hear a variety of opinions to add on the poster advertisement.
·



Modality words, simple and compound sentences.

·


Explain to students that they will now need to decide on three arguments for and three against to include on their poster. They will need to use modality words listed on the board and make sure they include a variety of simple and compound sentences. Revise this if necessary. This will be a draft in pencil. Students can decorate and finish on A3 paper in class teachers time. Poster can be displayed around the room.
·

·

Agreeing or disagreeing

·


Lesson 4
Discussion topic four, “Should kids have bike licences?”
Break up into small groups for 5 minutes to discuss topic. Each group to share ideas, but at the end of each group sharing their ideas, the other groups can respond by agreeing or disagreeing.
·



Sequencing

·


Students then receive a jumbled discussion on the topic and in pairs will need to reorder, but explain that it doesn’t matter which argument comes first.
·
·


Compound sentences


·

Students complete the last part independently. They will need to write an extra argument for and an extra argument against on separate pieces of paper strips handed out by the teacher. Focus on compound sentences and remind. They can use ideas shared at the beginning of the lesson, or one of the pictures which will be displayed at the front of the class. Once the teacher has proofread their extra arguments students can then add them to their jumbled text and paste in books. Display teachers A3 un-jumbled text on board.


·

Dictation

·



Lesson 5
Discussion topic five, “Should there be more recycling bins in the local community?”
Explain to students that they will need to use their imagination for this activity, to pretend. Students will need to imagine that the two teachers in the class are guest speakers (or ask Glenn and Dalz to come down at separate times to act as if they are from the local council expressing either for / against arguments for above topic). Students listen and when they leave recalling the arguments raised as a class. Teachers can add the points on the board. Teacher to introduce pictures and see if any match what speakers talked about.
·




·



Modelling how to compose a simple discussion on above topic with approx two supporting arguments. Inform students they will need to come up with the third argument Independently.
·
·
·

Complex sentences, connectives


·

Once modal / joint construction is complete, students copy into books, adding one extra argument for and against. In modal, use complex sentences, connectives.


·

Comparing, negotiating, describing.
·
·


Lesson 6
Discussion topic six, “Should there be more community facilities in the area?”
In small groups students will orally discuss the community facilities that are in the local area. Ones that they probably use. Each group will share responses to class while teacher writes them on white board or butchers paper. Break up into same groups but this time discussing facilities they would like to see in their area like an ice skating rink, or homeless centres etc… Share and the teacher to add them on the board/butchers paper.
·



Simple discussion.



·
Using all the knowledge learnt this far, student’s write a simple discussion on above topic. Make sure there are a lot of picture prompts and discussion examples at the front of the room to assist students. Depending on class limit the amount of arguments. 2-3 on each.


·

























Evaluation
What worked: (include comments about pedagogy, student achievement and staff roles where appropriate)













Future directions: (strategies used, concepts revisited)